donut-kun:

The proper response to street harassment

donut-kun:

The proper response to street harassment

(Source: grrlyman, via ayowassuppp)

Fear of a Black Victim [credit]

(Source: doomsday519, via ayowassuppp)

chillona:

blastortoise:

Autopsy report showed that mike brown had no drugs in his system and the store owners said that there was no robbery so what the fuck else do you racist ass whites want

They fumblin like, “UHM HE WAS SUSPENDED THAT 1 TIME IN SCHOOL???? HE, UHM, HE, HE WAS NO ANGEL! HE WORE HOODIES?!?!!!!!!”

(via ayowassuppp)

katiegeewhiz:

I REALLY LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS

katiegeewhiz:

I REALLY LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS

(Source: neilaglet, via ayowassuppp)

Don’t you think it’s better to be extremely happy for a short while, even if you lose it, than to be just okay for your whole life?

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler’s Wife (via observando)

(via ayowassuppp)

glamidols:

Tim Curry as Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) 

glamidols:

Tim Curry as Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) 

(Source: goregirlsdungeon, via jesstinturnbullake)

There’s no point to a guy yelling, “Hey sexy baby” at me out of the passenger window of a car as it speeds past. Even if I was into creepy misogynists and wanted to give him my number, I couldn’t. The car didn’t even slow down. But that’s okay, because he wasn’t actually hitting on me. The point wasn’t to proposition me or chat me up. The only point was to remind me, and all women, that our bodies are his to stare at, assess, comment on, even touch. “Hey sexy baby” is the first part of a sentence that finishes, “this is your daily message from the patriarchy, reminding you that your body is public property”.

1. Don’t ever tell anyone they look tired.
2. Help people, and if you offer to help someone, follow through.
3. Be kind to people who work in retail and food service.
4. Let someone know you’re not interested.
5. Actually “hang out sometime.”
6. Be a little more honest.
7. Stop calling each other mean names on the internet.
8. Send more letters (not emails) and gifts.
9. Give more genuine complements.
10. Have more patience while waiting in lines.

flirtytwink:

I just wanna do cute things with you like crush the patriarchy, fight for gender equality and help to destroy racism

(Source: jonasbruhs, via taintedlips)

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

(via thecityofus)

lnnea:

my favourite color is cute boys

(via fake-mermaid)

imdemetrialynn:

toocooltobehipster:

[video]

lmfaoo this shit is funny & important to watch

(via jesstinturnbullake)

irishgleelock:

women dont have rights over their own bodies

innocent black people are getting gunned down

people are having to protest for basic human rights

did i just describe 1914 or 2014?

(via taintedlips)

jackviolet:

The cop who shot a dog in front of its 6 year old owner was fired after outrage from the community and a “Justice for Apollo” campaign.

The cop who shot an unarmed black teen is on paid leave and remains protected by his department. So far, days of outrage and protest have still not brought any justice to Mike Brown.

In America, in 2014, the life of a black man is valued less than that of a dog.

Literally.

(via fake-mermaid)